OAKLAND -- A small weighing station and mini-mart catering to truck drivers and longshore workers at the Port of Oakland will close this month, and customers say that without it, they'll be forced to haul their big-rigs through West Oakland to find a place to eat and grab supplies.

 

 
 
Port officials need the store, called Oakland Port Scale, to move because they are making room for a 27-acre logistics warehouse as part of its share of the Oakland Army Base redevelopment.

 

 

 
 
But West Oakland resident Brian Beveridge said he fears that without companies like Oakland Port Scale to serve truck drivers on port property, those same customers will be roaming through the neighborhood in search of a cup of coffee and a place to weigh their rigs. He remembers what it was like when he moved to the neighborhood in 1999.

 

Sharon Read, left, assists customer Fredrick Shumatè at the Oakland Port Scale and Mini Mart at the Port of Oakland in Oakland, Calif., on Thursday, Sept.
Sharon Read, left, assists customer Fredrick Shumatè at the Oakland Port Scale and Mini Mart at the Port of Oakland in Oakland, Calif., on Thursday, Sept. 1, 2016. The truck weighing station and convenience store that has been serving truckers, longshoremen and police officers at the port for the past 13 years maybe be forced to close this month over a leasing dispute. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group) ( ANDA CHU )

 

 
 
"There were trucks parked in all of the neighborhood residential streets," he said. "There were just trucks everywhere."

 

 

 
 
Beveridge is the co-director of the West Oakland Environmental Indicators Project (WOEIP), a resident-led, community-based organization that's been instrumental in removing big rigs from city streets.

 

 

 
 
Dust, exhaust fumes and industrial pollution have made the air quality in West Oakland among the worst in the Bay Area.

 

 

 
 
And despite new state regulations that put cleaner filters on diesel trucks serving the port, in its "Planning Healthy Places" report released in May, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District highlighted the neighborhood as one community still facing elevated concentrations of air pollutants, which, in turn, can lead to higher rates of asthma and other respiratory ailments.